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‘Cine-Mundial’ (1916-1946) goes digital!

If you've heard of Chalmers Publishing, then you probably know it as the publisher of the most famous weekly motion picture trade paper of the silent film era, Moving Picture World. What you may not know, however, is that Chalmers' New York office also published an important Spanish-language monthly film magazine: Cine-Mundial.  
Cine-Mundial

The Media History Digital Library is proud to present 30 years of Cine-Mundial, spanning from 1916 until 1946. Most of these issues come from the collection of the Library of Congress Packard Center for AudioVisual Conservation. You can find Cine-Mundial in the MHDL's Global Cinema Collection and Hollywood Studio System Collection. You can also run searches across every page of the magazine on our search platform, Lantern.

 
We asked Laura Isabel Serna, Assistant Professor at the University of Southern California and author of Making Cinelandia: American Films and Mexican Film Culture before the Golden Age, to write a description of the magazine for the MHDL. Here is Serna's insightful description (which is also available in a Spanish translation at the MHDL and Lantern): 
 

Cine-Mundial, the Spanish-language version of Moving Picture World, was published between 1916 and 1948. The magazine documents Hollywood’s growing dominance in Latin American markets in the 1920s and the emergence of national film industries, such as those of Mexico and Argentina after the introduction of sound film.   Far from being a mere translation of its English-language counterpart, Cine-Mundial focused on issues that were important to its readers in Latin American and Spain—the representation of Latin Americans on screen, the geo-politics of film distribution, and Hollywood's short foray into Spanish-language film production in the late 1920 and early 1930s. Functioning as both trade publication and fan magazine, its regular columns that featured reports from national correspondents and letters from readers from every corner of the Spanish-speaking world provides invaluable insight into Latin American audiences and their reception of both imported and nationally or regionally produced films. 

 
You can read our full Q & A with Prof. Serna on the MHDL blog. In the Q & A, Serna discusses Cine-Mundial, digital research methods, and her new book, Making Cinelandia, from Duke University Press. She also shares two of her favorite clippings from Cine-Mundial. 
 
Our thanks go to the Library of Congress Packard Campus and Bruce Long (who contributed the 1920 volume) for making possible the digitization of Cine-Mundial. Muchas gracias!

3 Responses

  1. vp19 says:

    Just used it as a resource for my latest “Carole & Co.” entry: http://carole-and-co.livejournal.com/647096.html

  2. Great tool to research Mexican silent cinema. Thanks!

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